Leadership and Creativity

Leadership and Creativity

In this series of blogs we are examining what separates good leaders from great leaders. The second specific competency among the “Big 8”identified by Korn/Ferry Lominger is Creativity.

Dan Pink speaks to the importance of creativity in his book, “A Whole New Mind”. Most of us are not particularly creative; creativity is often held down in our risk-adverse Western business culture. However, as the Western business world loses its hold on manufacturing and such commodity skills as computer programming and accounting, we need to move back to our creative and developmental mind sets. This will be critical if we are to remain competitive and continue to grow our economy in this century.

Creativity involves immersing yourself in the challenge, thinking broadly and examining multiple options. You need to facilitate effective brainstorming sessions which will utilize the best of each individual involved. You need to have an effective process to keep you on track. You must also implement your best ideas. Coming up with the idea is relatively easy; following through on it is often the hardest part.

We need to break free of our restraints and become more creative. We need to lead the way and create the future.

There are many ways to influence creativity. At Summit and Frontier we have developed a program called The Art of Team that utilizes abstract painting to help individuals and teams access their right-brain creativity. This is a great session to use just before a strategy or planning session or when brainstorming is required to find a new and creative solution.

We have also developed a decision making protocol that allows teams to move through a brainstorming session with purpose. It encourages all individuals to contribute, and keeps the process on tract so you get results.

Creativity is a key competency. How will you foster it in your team?

Contact us For More Details

Dealing with Ambiguity

Dealing with Ambiguity

In this series of Blogs we are examining what separates good leaders from great leaders. The first specific competency among the “Big 8” identified by Korn/Ferry Lominger is Dealing with Ambiguity.

According to studies, 90% of all decisions made by middle managers and above are ambiguous. The higher the position, the more ambiguity there is. It is rare to have all the information and know the perfect solution. Problems are often so complex and contain so many facets that it is impossible to have perfect clarity. Most people, given all the facts could make the right decision. However, this rarely happens. Great leaders are able to comfortably make more good decisions than bad with limited information, in less time, and with few or no precedents on how it was solved in the past.

To cope with this effectively: Take small incremental steps; Balance thinking with action; Broaden your horizon; Get organized; and Ask the right questions to define the problem.

To learn more pick up FYI – For Your Improvement by Lombardo and Eichinger.

Contact us For More Details 

Traits of a Great Leader

Traits of a Great Leader

What is it that separates a good leader from a great leader?

This question has long been asked with no clear answer emerging. However, recent research by Korn/Ferry Lominger believes there are very specific competencies that leaders must have. These have been called THE BIG 8 and include: Dealing with Ambiguity; Creativity; Innovation Management; Motivating Others; Planning; Strategic Agility; Building Effective Teams; and Managing Vision and Purpose.

A recent study revealed that 90% of all managers think they are in the top 10% of performers in their organization. However, further research has indicated that only 12% of executives are competent in 4 or more of the Big 8.

Obviously strengthening these competencies is essential to the overall success of your business. Through the use of the Voices 360, we can help each leader identify which areas they need to focus on most and, through the Development Tracker, we can help them create, implement, and assess their development.

Look for future blogs to discuss the Big 8 traits.

 

Contact us For More Details